I have written articles on how to start using RealmD and SSSD for integrating ubuntu into a windows network. However, prior to that I wrote an article on using PBIS. RealmD and SSSD is, by far, the superior method IMHO and experience, so for all of those folks that want to switch, you probably want to get rid of PBIS on a bunch of servers. To that end, I just wanted to drop a line (for myself and anyone else that needs it) on how to remove an existing PBIS install on a server.

Thankfully, PBIS did make it pretty easy, the two following commands will get you there:

sudo /opt/pbis/bin/domainjoin-cli leave
sudo /opt/pbis/bin/uninstall.sh uninstall

The first command disconnects/unjoins your server from the domain. The second command removes PBIS.

There is probably some additional cleanup that can and should be done as well but I think that the above will at least clear the way for working with SSSD and RealmD.

Cheers!

Reference:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/35916591/ubuntu-how-uninstall-powerbroker-identity-services

For this tutorial I will be walking through how to use a tool called Realmd to connect an Ubuntu Server or Ubuntu Desktop system to a Windows Active Directory Domain.

In the past I wrote an article talking about how to use Powerbroker Identity Services to do the same thing, but the scope of the article was limited to the server version of Ubuntu only. Furthermore, it has since been my experience that PBIS is an unreliable solution at best.

Part of the confusion I have had on this issue in the last two years has been in thinking that there are only one or maybe two ways to make an Ubuntu Desktop/Server OS connect to a Microsoft Active Directory domain and they both used the same underlying stuff. In fact there are more like 10 different ways to do it all using a mix and match of different technologies.

Finally, I don’t like proprietary stuff. PBIS, while having a free version, was still proprietary. Today we will be using a suite of tools called SSSD. SSSD was created by Redhat and it’s opensource. Furthermore we will be using RealmD, which is a “wrapper” of sorts for SSSD that makes it easier to setup and configure. That’s the short of it. Let’s get started. (more…)

One of the things I like having is a remote system I can access and work on from anywhere. In the past this has meant using either a dedicated server (expensive) or VPS (which is just a VM… too slow).

With Proxmox, I figured I had the option of using a container, which would mean very good performance and not having to dedicate a whole server. However none of the container templates that I could find came with a desktop or VNC out of the box. After much tinkering with different options, I think I finally have found the best solution for getting a running headless VNC server in a Linux container. (more…)

If you load Proxmox 4.0 from OVH or any of their affiliates you end up with a partition scheme that gives you one big logical volume for data that is formatted to EXT3.

That will work but it isn’t desirable. Starting with Proxmox 3.4, support for the ZFS filesystem was added. ZFS is more than just a file system though and as a result it adds in enhanced functionality. In this article I will be walking through how to transition from the OVH, KimSufi, SoYouStart default partition layout on an existing system running Proxmox to a layout with ZFS. (more…)

So I wanted to start playing around with Docker and LXC containers and all kinds of other fun stuff on one of my cheap Kimsufi dedicated servers. I immediately ran into a problem though, Kimsufi (and parent company OVH, and probably sister company SoYouStart) use a modified Ubuntu Kernel. Why do they do this?

In short: optimization, speed, compatibility, control, etc. You can read a bit more about it here if you care to:
http://blog.infertux.com/2012/11/05/how-to-install-a-vanilla-debian-on-a-kimsufi/

That’s fine for 90% of what most people do, not so much for virtualization and quasi-virtualization type stuff like Docker and LXC containers.

I ran into a problem on the first step when I went to install the kernel extras package. It looked something like this: (more…)