I haven’t posted in ages due to being generally slammed with work but this little piece I threw together was too good to forget about so I wanted to put it down.

If you work with a larger owncloud deployment and have a lot of users and allow file sharing, you may be curious to occasionally take a look at how many shares there are, who owns them, who they are shared with. This isn’t easy to get from the Web GUI but via the command line and mysql it isn’t bad at all.

So, login to mysql on the command line and then use your owncloud database; ie. (if your db name is “owncloud”)

use owncloud;

Then run the following:

select id, share_with, uid_owner, item_type, file_target from oc_share
INTO OUTFILE '/var/lib/mysql-files/shares.csv'
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
ENCLOSED BY '"'
LINES TERMINATED BY '\n';

Exit mysql command line and go to /var/lib/mysql-files and you will find a nicely formatted CSV file with a list of all shares and who they are shared with. The columns from left to right…

ID, Who it is shared with (one line per person/group), the person that owns the share, whether or not it is a file or folder, the name/location of the file/folder that is shared

Cheers…

I have decided to give Ubuntu 17.04 LTS Desktop a go. On a whim I installed it on a laptop I had lying about (being an IT person they tend to proliferate over a given period of time in my office… older units becoming doorstops, newer units lovely “Jenga” blocks and maybe the occasional Proxmox cluster…) Since this seems to be the final days of Unity (which I actually don’t mind as a Desktop all that much), I figured now was a good time to take another poke at it as a daily personal driver. I was happy to come across an option for full disk encryption during the install process and wanted to pass my few thoughts on it along. (more…)

This lovely item came across my feed today and I realized there is so much that I do poorly when it comes to shell scripting it is absurd 🙁

https://dev.to/thiht/shell-scripts-matter

Anyhow I am extremely thankful for this long and detailed post and wanted to pass it along to my readership.

I also wanted to crowd-source a bit of information from you all.

I am familiar with the idea of a code repository but have never really used one. I have had a lot of people suggest I use GIT. I am curious if that is the general consensus or if anyone else has other suggestions? I have a project that consists of some pretty crazy scripts (well, crazy for me, 1000+ lines). Trying to keep track of versions and changes in a script that large is difficult to say the least. I am looking for something easy to use and quick to deploy. Thoughts welcome.

A little over six months ago I started researching the quickly emerging world of “Hyper-converged” infrastructure as a new IT ethos to take my company’s IT operations into the next decade of application and data hosting. I was first introduced to the idea when I attended a webinar from Simplivity, one of the leading companies in this new market. I was immediately intrigued… the underlying question that Hyper-convergence answers is “What happens if you radically simplify the data-center by collapsing storage and compute into one all-encompassing platform?

The broader idea of convergence has been around for a while. I started seeing it with the advent of wider 10 Gbe adoption; the idea of taking a single (or +1 for redundancy) high-speed LAN connection and splitting up into multiple logically separate connections. I.E. you could “converge” management, application, and storage LAN connections down into a single wire. The wider over-arching concept predates even this.

Expand that thought into the virtualization space. Virtualization has been around for a very long time but traditionally if you wanted to get some kind of fault-tolerant system setup it required a complex stack of centralized network attached storage, management software, and a clustered hypervisor. Not to mention (often) separate networking equipment for both the storage and hypervisor nodes.

The promise of hyper-convergence is that many of those disparate parts can go away and instead you can host your workloads on a unified, easily scaled, inherently redundant, platform that encompasses all of your storage and compute needs while simplifying a majority of your networking. Wikipedia sums it up nicely. Rather than reinventing the wheel I will just refer you there if this is a new concept: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyper-converged_infrastructure

Hyper-convergence is a rather elegant answer, especially if the product is designed from the outset to BE a hyper-converged platform. My premise in this article is that Scale Computing is one of the few (perhaps the only?) “proven” vendors that have developed a product from the ground up as a hyper-converged system. Based on a lot of the FUD I came across while researching, I got the distinct impression that a large number of people don’t understand this fundamental difference between Scale and the majority of other HCI products currently populating the market. This is a long post, get coffee now… (more…)

I have written articles on how to start using RealmD and SSSD for integrating ubuntu into a windows network. However, prior to that I wrote an article on using PBIS. RealmD and SSSD is, by far, the superior method IMHO and experience, so for all of those folks that want to switch, you probably want to get rid of PBIS on a bunch of servers. To that end, I just wanted to drop a line (for myself and anyone else that needs it) on how to remove an existing PBIS install on a server.

Thankfully, PBIS did make it pretty easy, the two following commands will get you there:

sudo /opt/pbis/bin/domainjoin-cli leave
sudo /opt/pbis/bin/uninstall.sh uninstall

The first command disconnects/unjoins your server from the domain. The second command removes PBIS.

There is probably some additional cleanup that can and should be done as well but I think that the above will at least clear the way for working with SSSD and RealmD.

Cheers!

Reference:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/35916591/ubuntu-how-uninstall-powerbroker-identity-services