Halloween is over but the the world is still a scary place. In a continuation of a thought from an article I wrote a few weeks back for Auditing AzureSQL Firewall Policies, I thought I would also include a short function for auditing azure storage accounts that are currently configured for “public” access.
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I periodically review Azure PaaS resource edge security. As a part of that process I examine and cleanup AzureSQL firewall rules. Once you have more than a handful of subscriptions and AzureSQL databases, doing this manually starts becoming unfeasible. To that end, Azure Powershell is your friend…

As is typical, you need to install the Powershell AZ module on your workstation, after that you need to run.

Connect-AzAccount

Then supply your Azure credentials (preferably creds that have the ability to view and manage all of your AzureSQL databases and firewall rules, otherwise the rest is moot.
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A colleague of mine recently solved one of the biggest pain points I have dealt with regarding Office365 – that is, Microsoft’s seemingly hit-or-miss modern authentication.

Symptoms look like this:
1. Outlook client can’t connect and/or authenticate for end-users
2. Turning on Azure MFA for an end-user ruins their life (and yours) because all office applications, teams, etc. break.
3. Admins have an impending sense of “dread” when setting up systems for new users because 80% of the time they are going to spend hours sorting out the above issues.
4. You call Microsoft Support complaining of these issues and they are eventually stumped and tell you to rebuild the desktop/laptop from scratch… great for end-users that deal with this issue 1 year into the job and rather like their systems as-is… -or- MS Support tells you to pop a registry key into the end-user’s system which just disables Modern Authentication all together – which may fix Outlook but leaves many many other things broken…
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FIRST – I am stealing code here and re-sharing (with very little modification). All credit goes the fine gentleman that wrote these two articles, I would urge you to read them:

Bulk Add IP Access Restrictions to Azure App Service Using AZ Powershell

Bulk Add Cloudflares IPs to Azure App Service Access Restrictions Using AZ Powershell

I made a few minor modifications the provided code. First, I like to just run a lot of my Azure Powershell stuff from an ISE session and don’t like encapsulating everything in new commands. Partly because I am not all that familiar with working that way even though it is probably a MUCH better way of doing things.

Before we get to the code though, what is this for exactly?

If you use cloudflare as a protection and CDN layer for a website it works by acting as a reverse proxy for your site. I.E. client connects to your site by a cloudflare hosted DNS record… instead of connecting directly to your server, their connection terminates at Cloudflare, they do things, then the pass the connection along to your actual service. ‘Nuff said, google if you need more info.

In the case of an Azure Web App (or any other web server I supposed), the app is hosted/available on some public IP and/or azure domain name that azure provides when you create the app…

What this means is that someone can easily bypass your cloudflare layer (and the associated performance enhancements and protections like web application firewalls) if they know your source systems IP address and in the case of azure, your azure provided domain name for your app.

So what that means is that you need to setup an ACL (Access Control List) on your source system to say “Allow traffic from all Cloudflare IP ranges and block everyone else”.

Cloudflare has like 20 IP ranges… And setting up that ACL by hand on a web app in Azure is arduous at best. But that is why we have scripting… to make things that are generally a pain in the rear… NOT a pain in the rear. (more…)

Currently I am looking into a couple of different cloud platforms for new infrastructure projects. Microsoft Azure is creeping up rather highly on the list.

A few years ago the concepts of “security” and “cloud hosting” were diametrically opposed in many people’s minds. Security is an ironic field of IT in that technology, vulnerabilities and exploits, defense and remediation strategy, etc. all evolve very rapidly (like other areas of IT) but due to being tied in tightly with things like regulatory compliance the ideology and actual implementation of change in this area moves at a snail’s pace.

However IT is largely shifting towards cloud technologies and regulation must shift with it. The major players in the cloud hosting space have recognized a need to address security concerns and have made a concerted effort to do so.
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