Currently I am working on integrating some 10Gbe switches into an existing 1Gbe network. Being completely new to 10 Gbe I wasn’t prepared for the volley of new terms, acronyms, and gotcha’s that were thrown my way.

Initially I had a very hard time finding answers to some basic questions. So I figured I would write a quick post for everyone else having the same struggles… Excuse my laymen explanations and gross oversimplifications which are to follow… To some I may sound the dunce, so be it. I hope this is helpful to all the other dunces :).
(more…)

One of most difficult things to find (imho) is information about API and Service URL’s for just about any and all applications. Microsoft is better than some (Dell, I am looking at you…) but it can still require some metaphorical google search back flips to get to the right information.

That said… I wanted to quickly document the right mix of URL’s that must be allowed in order for Windows OS license activation to work: (more…)

SQL instances running a lot of databases can get a bit confusing as to what is kept where. Especially if said instance was setup by someone else in times prior. To that end, there is a very handy query you can run in SSMS to quickly return the on-disk file locations of all SQL data files. You can use this query exactly as-is with no modification:

SELECT name, physical_name AS current_file_location
FROM sys.master_files

This will output a nicely formatted table including filename and folder path, including the Master database and Temp Database files.


Reference:
http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2009/02/17/sql-server-find-current-location-of-data-and-log-file-of-all-the-database/

Every now and then I venture into writing an article about consumer technology. One of my favorite areas of consumer tech is low-cost media center type devices… e.g. Roku, Amazon Fire TV, nVidia Shield TV, and a host of off-brand media players and sticks you can pick-up on Amazon.

I consider myself a bit of a geek and I like to tinker, however when it comes to my TV, I have come to the point where I like solutions that just “work” out of the box for watching content. Our family cut the cord around 7 or so years ago starting with a “Western Digital TV Media Player” and moving on from there… (more…)

The Event Viewer is a very useful tool however, like any log management solution, the biggest hurdle can be filtering out the noise and returning only the meaningful log data that you care about.

This is a follow-up on a previous article which can be viewed here: Finding Human Logins in the Windows Event Viewer – Suppressing Everything Else

One of the most common requests is seeing who has been in and out of a box. To that end, I want to expand a bit more and talk about how to filter on the following three things… Username, Event ID, and Logon Type.
(more…)