I periodically review Azure PaaS resource edge security. As a part of that process I examine and cleanup AzureSQL firewall rules. Once you have more than a handful of subscriptions and AzureSQL databases, doing this manually starts becoming unfeasible. To that end, Azure Powershell is your friend…

As is typical, you need to install the Powershell AZ module on your workstation, after that you need to run.

Connect-AzAccount

Then supply your Azure credentials (preferably creds that have the ability to view and manage all of your AzureSQL databases and firewall rules, otherwise the rest is moot.
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When your business hinges upon remote workers and remote offices, secure connections, and lots of data manipulation… how do you deal with some of your folks being extra remote? Granted the internet in 2020 is very different from the internet in say 2008 and the world has grown ever smaller as a result… but distance and all of the congested, intervening, network hops that come with it are still a reality. Particularly for remote workers living on other continents that have to interface regularly with systems in the United States as a part of their job.

The two big headaches for remote workers in other countries connecting to offices in the US are latency and bandwidth. In the past there were only and handful of solutions, most involving long-term contracts with a telcom and lengthy, complicated setups. I would argue that MPLS still falls squarely in this camp. SD-WAN has certainly improved on all of the above but it’s still enough of a headache that it typically involves contract terms and conversations with sales “engineers.”

I would like to propose something different using Azure.
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The current state of the world has caused some unique stresses on IT infrastructure. For IT departments servicing internal teams, remote access infrastructure in particular has felt the brunt of the blow. To that end, I spent a couple of weeks testing out enterprise VPN solutions.
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Continuing on my journey up the Azure Automation mountain, I recently completed a simple AZ PowerShell script that takes several input parameters and scales UP or scales DOWN a given AzureSQL database instance depending on what time of day it is.

Before I go any further, if you are just getting started in Azure Automation, I wrote another article here which may help you avoid some of the headaches I ran into as part of my initial foray:
Azure Automation – Powershell – Getting it Working – Authentication the “Easy” Way -and- Ditching AzureRM

BACKGROUND
Azure has excellent auto-scaling parameters built-in for scaling App Services horizontally (i.e. “out” and “in”… adding or decreasing instance count). However for vertical scaling of AzureSQL services, you are pretty much left to your own devices.

I have an “okay” amount of experience using AZ Powershell to script and get things done in my Azure Subscriptions and with that in mind and the task set in front of me of auto-scaling our AzureSQL databases based on time of day (scale up before the busy hours, scale down when the quiet hours start) I turned to Azure Automation to get the work done.

Being an IT professional of several years, I did what we all do… I turned to Google and searched for scripts I could just steal, modify, and use (I am nodding at you right now…). However, if your want to use “AZ” Powershell instead of the deprecated “AzureRM”… I think the term is… “forgetaboutit.” The templates and examples that I found were either based on Powershell “Workflows” which I didn’t want to mess with and/or used the old AzureRM Powershell syntax. So I then turned to… Powershell ISE… and started writing.
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