Making use of a SAN (storage area network) provides some incredible benefits. I won’t go into depth but at a high-level you often get:

1. Excellent hardware redundancy for data storage, more-so if you are using multiple arrays but even most enterprise single arrays can provide N+1 redundancy. Now we can tolerate power failures, and drive failures, and switch failures, etc…

2. Extra options for historical data integrity/backup/dr – Most enterprise SAN’s support features for volume snapshots and rollbacks. Some even support advanced features specific to protecting MS-SQL and I am sure other database products. Our implementation also provides some great options for DR, like being able to replicate data/volumes from a production SAN over to a different SAN in a different network/datacenter.

3. Administrative ease… managing storage volumes for all of your systems from one interface makes life much easier.

4. Online disk resizing — did your database run out of disk space? You have plenty of space available on your SAN though on which the volume is hosted? No problem, just increase the size of the volume on the SAN (often something you can do while the volume is online and being used) and then increase the partition in windows to take up the new volume space (also an online operation).

For these reasons (and I am sure many many more), SAN’s have become a staple in a lot of enterprise networks. But let me talk about some pain points, particularly in older SAN implementations and particularly around iSCSI and older networks.
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Currently I am working on integrating some 10Gbe switches into an existing 1Gbe network. Being completely new to 10 Gbe I wasn’t prepared for the volley of new terms, acronyms, and gotcha’s that were thrown my way.

Initially I had a very hard time finding answers to some basic questions. So I figured I would write a quick post for everyone else having the same struggles… Excuse my laymen explanations and gross oversimplifications which are to follow… To some I may sound the dunce, so be it. I hope this is helpful to all the other dunces :).
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