The Event Viewer is a very useful tool however, like any log management solution, the biggest hurdle can be filtering out the noise and returning only the meaningful log data that you care about.

This is a follow-up on a previous article which can be viewed here: Finding Human Logins in the Windows Event Viewer – Suppressing Everything Else

One of the most common requests is seeing who has been in and out of a box. To that end, I want to expand a bit more and talk about how to filter on the following three things… Username, Event ID, and Logon Type.
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I have a limited number of IPv4 addresses available to me on my servers. So I am really frugal with how I assign them.

Whenever possible, my preference is to use NAT off of the main Proxmox IP. However I struggled to get this setup while also using the built-in Proxmox firewall that comes in version 4.0. Having an enabled firewall is an absolute requirement for me.

In this article I have documented the final working solution. (more…)

On Thursday I released an article detailing how to get Proxmox setup and also how to configure networking with IPv6. However that article got long and I just said I would address the firewall in the future. Well, that’s today because I need to get the configuration stuff written down before I forget. In addition to the firewall there are some other security house keeping items for a new proxmox install, that includes disabling the root account and using sudo and changing the default SSH port. So let’s go.

The base OS under Proxmox is Debian. Debian is great and it is lighter-weight than Ubuntu so I am all for using it.

If you are already somewhat comfortable with Proxmox and Debian configuration and just prefer I get to the point then (more…)

Last year Google proposed marking any and all sites not using SSL in a negative fashion in its Chrome browser. This year they are indicating they plan on moving forward with this:

Google Chrome gets ready to mark all HTTP sites as ‘bad’

To clarify what this means for small content creators… an extra ~$100+ a year for hosting a website, not to mention SSL adds a layer of complexity to the hosting. (more…)