I love Hyper-V 3.0… particularly compared to earlier versions. It comes packed with some very nice new features, several of which are geared around the idea of thin deployment. One such feature is Dynamic Memory. Dynamic Memory allows you to set a base “Starting” amount of RAM for a server (say something low like 512 MB) and then also set a max amount it can take up (say 8 Gb). The idea is that you can over-provision RAM on a Host server and still be okay if the majority of your VM’s are usually just sitting their idle. Which in most cases they usually are. The problem is that on the client machine, if you are running Windows Task manager at least, you will almost always see 90 – 95% memory utilization and it will show whatever the max is that your server can scale to (say 8 GB).

This really threw me off recently. I had one VM that was misbehaving due to having the VHDX file on a slow share on a storage array. Initially, not knowing what was broken, I took a look at task manager on the VM (which was running Server 2012) and noted that it was showing nearly Maxed out RAM usage. Further investigation though showed that it couldn’t possibly be using more than 1 Gb (of the 8 Gb shown in task manager) at any one time.

After some further investigation I learned that this is common behavior on VM’s that are allocated memory dynamically and nothing to be concerned with. The VM today still has dynamic memory and still shows 95% usage pretty much all the time but runs just fine now that the VHDX file has been moved to faster storage. Anyhow, hope this helps someone else out!

The company I work for has some rather remote offices and we are in the process of virtualizing some of our infrastructure components, particularly our remote domain controllers. I have done a remote DC deployment in one of our other foreign offices and the replication of the Domain took quite a while. In that case, I didn’t realize I would be rebuilding a domain controller in virtual until after I showed up at the office. This time though I know what I am going into. So… the goal? Build the DC here as a Hyper-V VM, export it to an encrypted drive, take it with me, and re-import the VM to the new Hyper-V server I will be putting in on the other side. I realize I will need to make some DNS updates as the AD server’s IP will be changing but, based on what I have read, I think this should go pretty smoothly! Wish me luck!

The company I work for is a relatively small shop when it comes to virtualization and especially when it comes to Hyper-V. So that means I am usually working on individual host servers and not doing any kind of grand scale configuration using SCCM or some other enterprise level tool. I think most folks in small-to-medium size businesses with existing infrastructure probably have a similar “use-case scenario” when it comes to Hyper-V.

We use Hyper-V primarily for development and test servers and often enough I get asked to deploy new servers. Now, the way I used to go about doing this was to create a new blank server, new empty VHD file, insert Server 2012 (or 2008 R2 or whatever…) CD/DVD ISO file and install from scratch. In this case, the actual install isn’t all that bad. Server 2012 particularly installs quite quickly. However downloading and installing all of the bloody Microsoft updates can take hours, tack onto that configuring the server for our environment and well, it gets to be a couple hours of work at least.
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INTRODUCTION

I wrestled with getting OpenVPN to work with Microsoft Active Directory authentication better part of 2 days. I was surprised that it was so hard to find a straightfoward tutorial on the topic that actually worked! I had to do a lot of Google-Fu and look at many different pages to put together what I needed to get this done. So… to hopefully save myself and others some future headache. I endeavor to put most of it all together here. This guide assume a few things about the audience though that you should know up front…
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